Primrose Hill Solar Village 

After 6 and a half years of use, the low carbon technologies at Primrose Hill are all working well. Reduced reliance on grid electricity means the service charge is much lower, so the benefits of the technology are being passed on to residents.

Yorkshire Housing

Client  Yorkshire Housing
Location  Huddersfield
Completion  2006
Cost  £7m

Services

  • RIBA stages 1-6
  • Feasibility study
  • Architectural design
  • Public consultation
  • Advice on offsite construction

Awards

  • RICS Awards – Innovation and Design Category (Commendation)
  • RIBA Awards – Best Buildings in Yorkshire (Highly Commended)
  • Yorkshire’s Finest Property Awards – Most Innovative Development Plan
  • Excel Housing Excellence Awards – Best Affordable Housing Scheme
  • Built Quality Awards – Best Sustainable Development (West Yorkshire)

Solar Village provides 79 affordable homes on two adjacent brownfield sites in a run down area of Huddersfield.

The scheme comprises 31 three and four-bed family houses arranged in two saw-tooth terraces, and 48 units housed in a three-storey apartment building. The apartment building has a crescent configuration and overlooks a private central courtyard with a sheltered south-facing garden area.

Larch timber cladding gives a warm and natural feel to the exterior of the buildings, and is complemented by timber windows and rendering.

All dwellings benefit from photovoltaic panels to generate electricity, and solar panels to preheat hot water. The design of the houses allow the panels to be orientated southwards for optimum efficiency. Carbon dioxide emissions were minimised with the installation of the solar and pv panels, low energy light fittings, natural ventilation and gas combination boilers.

The homes were built using offsite construction. A prefabricated concrete panel system was selected for the apartments which improved accuracy and safety on site and reduced wastage of materials and installation time. The system was manufactured locally in Holmfirth to minimise carbon miles.

Photography David Millington